Monday, September 12, 2016

#NeverForget


Four years ago, my parents and I visited New York City. Our trip only lasted two days, but we made use of every minute we had in The Big Apple.

On the first day, we strolled through Central Park and Grand Central Terminal, ate lunch at the Plaza Hotel, enjoyed a delicious dessert at Georgetown Cupcake, took a ferry to Ellis Island and the Statue of Liberty,  rode the subway to Hoboken for more treats at Carlo's Bake Shop, and absorbed the magic of Time Square at night. Over a 12-hour period, we walked all the way from 86th Ave on the Upper East Side to the southern tip of Lower Manhattan.

The next morning at 5am, we braved the rain to be in the background of NBC's TODAY Show in Rockefeller Plaza and had a quick chat with anchor Ann Curry. Then we power-walked over to ABC Studios to catch the end of Good Morning America, where we came face-to-face with country music star Carrie Underwood.

Our next stops were Trinity Church Wall Street, St. Patrick's Cathedral, the Empire State Building, the United States Branch Bank, and the New York Stock Exchange.

Two hours before heading to the airport to catch our flight home, we visited one final attraction, the September 11 Memorial at Ground Zero. Although the museum was still under construction, simply standing on the grounds of the World Trade Center was a humbling experience. We passed by the Survivor Tree and peered over the railings of the reflecting pools, which were built within the footprint of the Twin Towers.

May we never forget the 3,000 men and women who lost their lives during the terror attacks of 9/11 and those who risked their lives to bring thousands more to safety.

What are your memories of September 11, 2001? For those of us who were old enough to remember, the footage of the airplanes flying into the Twin Towers will forever be ingrained in our minds. We must always pay tribute to that day, for as Winston Churchill once said, "Those who fail to learn from history are doomed to repeat it."

15 comments:

  1. Anonymous9/12/2016

    There are really no words to describe the level of hate for the people behind this hate crime on Americans. Evil and demons are the first words that come to mind.

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    1. Anonymous9/12/2016

      We sure don't spare the destruction right back, though, when the leaders think it's warranted.

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    2. Anonymous9/12/2016

      Sept 12 @ 3:01..what?? I don't understand what you said?

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    3. Anonymous9/13/2016

      I don't know if it's enough to think of evil and demon. I respect your feelings, but in all of us there's a part of evil and demons (and it can show in how we react to tragic events). I think that if we are in the position (and we almost always are) to think about it and meditate a proper reaction, it's really our duty to act in a firm but peaceful way. Let's build peace together, not war! :)
      I know that this is hard to understand and sometimes the use of force is necessary, but what has the invasion of Arab countries post 9/11 brought us to? I honestly don't see a good situation, this policy of was has only brought more terror.

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    4. Anonymous9/14/2016

      I am the original poster of the comment at top "there are really no words....". What I was saying is that the level of hate that the people behind this crime on americans had on americans must be through the roof. I did not mean MY level of hate. I don't hate anyone, that is poisonous to carry such strong negative feelings inside. I may not have worded what I was trying to say originally, in a correct way.

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  2. Shela G9/12/2016

    In 1996 I visited a friend in New Jersey during my time with her family. We spent a Sunday in New York went to time square church then took the subway to China town for lunch. I had so wanted to go to the top of the empire state building but
    Her family talked me into going to the world trade center because it was closer to where we were and I would be able to see as much of if not more of the city from the top.
    I stood there looking out at the beautiful city of New York taking pictures and soaking in the expeience not knowing what it would mean to me after 9-11-2001. I will never forget.

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  3. Anonymous9/12/2016

    I remember I was sitting in class in 7th grade and our teacher explaining what had just happened. I did not fully understand the impact it would have on us. But I remember it was a gloomy day.

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  4. Anonymous9/12/2016

    I consider NYC my second home. Have been going there since before I was born. Literally - parents were from there. Generations of family living there since the 1850's. Baptized there. Business & pleasure still take me there. That September morning was horrible and numbing. I didn't turn on the TV til just after 9am Eastern and by then things were happening that I didn't understand. Just awful, not knowing what was going on or what would happen next. The panic, the rubble, the lives lost. Unforgettable. I was at Ground Zero not long after, when you could get near there again and see the holes. Heartbreaking. I had watched those towers being built decades ago. Never knew they'd crash down one awful day. I haven't been to the memorial yet. Didn't want to go when it first opened. I'm not big on going to "touristy" spots in the city, especially not right after they open. Not a good way to describe that spot, but you know what I mean. I know what it's like to be on the streets of NYC and hear constant sirens, or hear a loud bang, or see smoke, or even see white steam from a steam pipe explosion. Your knee-jerk reaction is, "Oh no, is something happening all over again?" I don't feel that enough is being done to keep the city safe. Yes, I know there are things going on behind the scenes that we are purposely not supposed to know about or be seeing. But I'd like to see more visible security in the city, other than in Times Square. Some trips, that's the only place were I'll see a uniformed officer. Feels like you're on your own when in the Subway, like it's up to you to keep watch. The day-to-day crime is hard enough to be on the lookout for. I really hope there are good measures in place guarding the city the rest of the time. You know someone will try again, and they have, with some "small" incidents around the city since 9/11, almost like test runs. Our airport security is still a joke. I was given someone else's boarding pass by mistake and allowed to get on the plane in NYC. Didn't know I had someone else's pass til armed guards came on the plane on the tarmac to question where I got that pass ("The airline printed it out and gave it to me at the ticket counter when I checked in!"). So there's still room for error, unfortunately. Never forget, and step up your guard, too. Please.

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  5. Anonymous9/12/2016

    I'm from Europe but I remember very well tha day: I was 13 years old, it was the early afternoon for us and I was at a friend's house to hang out. I remember seeing the attacks on tv and how shocking it was.
    Se could spend a lot of words, but for me the most important thing to remark is the importance of peace and acceptance as a way of handling every human relationship, may it be personal or political. It all stems from there: if we help the next generations to grew up in peace, acceptance of each other's differences and respect, maybe we won't have to see these terrible days anymore.

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  6. I remember on Sept 11, 2001, I was in second grade. What I remember of that day was watching the news early in the morning as I was getting ready for school. Then as my dad was rushing me to school because I missed the bus I believe, he had the news on and I remember hearing what was happening on the radio. I recall when I got to school that I was a little late and no one was outside. I remember the rest of that day sunny and beautiful but there were not planes flying and we could not go outside to play for recess. As a 7 and 8-year-olds who didn't understand at the time what was happening, my classmates and I were pretty unsure and unhappy. Now as a 20 something adult, I realize how silly we were and how great of an impact this has had on my life from that day forward. My heart aches for the tragedy occurred and my thoughts and prayers go out to anyone who were personally affected. I will never forget!

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  7. Anonymous9/12/2016

    I was at work and watched on the television screen in the library. My co-workers and I could only look at each other. My oldest daughter was a member of a high school band that had been invited to participate in the Macy's Parade. I was afraid to let her go, but she wanted to, and I decided to let go of the fear (very hard to do) and trust in the Lord, and she had a wonderful time considering what had recently happened. She had taken pictures of ground zero, and she said it was a sight that really couldn't be explained.

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  8. 9/11 was a very personal day for me; my husband was supposed to be on a train that goes into the world trade center at @9am that morning; my sister in law had called to ask if he was okay and that my brother ,who worked in the city as well ,was okay. I couldn't get in touch with my husband because the circuits were overloaded. I am a nurse and my hospital was in a Code Yellow - external disaster expecting many casualties. All I wanted to do was hug my 4 year old and 1 year old little girls- still not knowing where my husband was. But duty is duty and into work I went eventually never getting the number of casualties because of all the deaths and finding out my husband had taken an earlier train ( due to being upset (and not sleeping )about a Giants game the night before- talk about changing perspective quickly). My sisters husband came home covered in the ash from the buildings but thank God , he came home unlike so many people that horrible day. The bravery of hundreds will always be remembered and overpowers the evil of less.

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  9. I was a nanny at the time (waiting on my OT licensure at the time) and I was pushing a little one in the stroller. I heard 2 people yelling to each other about what had happened, and thought to myself, "why would people joke like that?" And then my friend called, I was in shock. Instantaneously, I turned around and walked as fast as I could back to the house. While walking through the park, I met "M" the mom of the boys that I watched- we hugged and both said, I pray that "D" (her husband) is alive. It wasn't till 12 hours later that we found out he had survived and ran to a family member's house. Living only 20 minutes from the city, it seemed so surreal.

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  10. Such a tragic day. Thank yout for your post.

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  11. Anonymous9/27/2016

    Wow! You all saw an amazing number of sights. I look forward to visiting the 911 memorial one day myself. You all had a fun itinerary. I'll have to use some of those ideas.

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