Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Snow Day 2.0

In the past four days, we have had two snow days here in Nashville. On Friday afternoon, we had an ice storm followed by a few inches of snow, which caused schools and businesses to close. Late last night, it started snowing again, and most folks are home from work and school today.

Mr. Handsome and I are enjoying the unexpected chance to spend time together. This morning, we grabbed a latte to share and went on a walk in the winter wonderland. It was 14F (-10C), but we bundled up and had a grand time.

The one downside of living in the South is that when winter weather does arrive, it isn't as easy to handle as it would be above the Mason-Dixon Line.

A typical winter in Nashville usually means daytime highs above freezing and overnight lows below freezing, so snow often turns into rain, which then freezes and makes driving treacherous. Cities and towns don't own enough plows and salt trucks to keep all the roads clear, so car accidents are more common. We have friends who live outside the city on winding roads that are never plowed or salted, so when snow and ice hit, they can't leave home until it melts.

The weather this winter has been far from average. In the past ten days, we have seen temperatures well above average--as high as 65F (18C)--and lows well below average--as low as 3F (-16C). With single-pane windows, our heater is working overtime. As I have done in past years, I purchased window insulator plastic to help keep the cold air out.

14 comments:

  1. Anonymous1/16/2018

    Snow days are fun Ellie, even for adults. It is a chance to have extra hours together. I know what you mean about ice, snow, lack of plows...... We lived on Vancouver Island for manu years and it was the same there. Any significant snowfall would grind the area to a halt. Now we are back in Alberta and plows are always working and grit mixture is put down on the roads and it would take a very intense severe snow blizzard to bring life to a standstill! We just retired before Christmas 2017, and every day is a snow day right now! Eileen.

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    1. Anonymous1/18/2018

      Congratulations Eileen, on you and your husband's retirement...Jane

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    2. Anonymous1/22/2018

      Thank you Jane, that is so nice of you. I love my husband so dearly and I am excited to be spending lots of time with him. We enjoy each other's company so much. Eileen

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  2. Anonymous1/16/2018

    Cute picture of you two there! it's (s)no(w) big deal when it snows where I live, but it would be a huge deal if it got to be 65F!

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  3. Anonymous1/16/2018

    Where I live we get lots of snow and on the weekends when my husband and I who are both off on weekends and there is snow, we go for walks too. It is so beautiful to see everything covered in snow and when the sun shines on the snow it just listens like diamonds. So Beautiful!

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  4. Anonymous1/17/2018

    Where I live this past Sunday night a ambulance slide on ice and flip over upside down on the interstate trying to take a patient to iowa citie hospital.

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  5. Anonymous1/17/2018

    Ellie could you put the regular temperature down instead of putting down of 65F (18 C because I don't know what that means. I only know when you say 20 degrees .

    Sorry for being rude.

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    1. Anonymous1/17/2018

      Ellie has put two temperatures down to ensure that people from a variety of countries know what temperature she means. F stands for degree 'Fahrenheit', C means degree 'Celsius'. Here in the U.K. we normally use Celsius. For example, freezing point is 32F or 0C. If Ellie just wrote '20 degrees', some readers would think she meant well below freezing while others would read that as really quite warm. Hope that helps to clear up your confusion.

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    2. Anonymous1/18/2018

      I would have putting a -20 degrees thst means it below freezing. What she put was above 20 degrees.

      I never heard of Fahrenheit or Celsius before.

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    3. Anonymous1/18/2018

      Basic science class teaches Fahrenheit and Celsius. Ellie has given the readings in both so depending on where you are from you will know the temperature.

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  6. oh wow it so interesting to hear other talk about snow and cold when they are not used to it. I live in ontario canada and it has been snowing for two days on and off. being winter we get at leaset a storm a week i would say. The temps have reach -33 C with the wind chill and we are still recovering from last weeks ice storm. busses are cancelled always but we weather the storm and are prepared to head out to work in it all lol. That's the worst part for me is the travel in the bad weather. I hate driving in the snow and ice but i'm Canadian and it all come with the territory i guess.

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  7. Anonymous1/17/2018

    It is a unique weather situation just where you live, borderline or transition line. I enjoyed learning about it from your explanation! If you were to move to a more definite type of weather colder or hotter which way would you want to go? Or do like that areas' weather the most?

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  8. What is the Mason-Dixon Line?

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    1. Anonymous1/19/2018

      Basically, the border between the states PA and MD. It used to be the assumed dividing line between "The North" and "The South." Nobody really uses that term any more.

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